Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.
jaedumitrescu

If The Trend Is Your Friend, Dana White's Wish For Weekly UFC Shows Could Happen Soon - FightLine.com

The winning lottery ticket was purchased at the Playland Market in Rye on August 25, 2012. According to New York Gaming Commission rules, winners have up to one year to claim their prize. New York Lottery officials have been urging players to check their tickets for the winning numbers: 1-6-7-20-49, Powerball 23, and come forward before the ticket expires. "We're hopeful the lucky winner has already signed the ticket and is making plans to claim it before it's too late," said Gardner Gurney, acting director of the Division of the Lottery. The New York Gaming Commission uses all means possible to get the word out when it is presented with an unclaimed prize, including news media and social media, said Christy Calicchia, spokesperson for the commission. To claim the money, the winner must present the ticket at any one of New York's seven customer service centers during business hours. Since the one-year anniversary of the ticket's purchase falls on a Sunday, the winner would technically need to have presented the ticket by the close of business Friday, said Calicchia. It is unclear how the situation would be handled if the ticket were to be turned in on Monday, she said. Lottery winners may also turn in winning tickets by mail. As long as the ticket is postmarked by August 25, it will be deemed valid. The gaming commission will be monitoring incoming mail to see if the ticket turns up, Calicchia said. New York state has seen several prizes go unclaimed, the largest of which was drawn more than a decade ago. In 2002, the owner of a winning ticket sold in Brooklyn never came forward to collect the $68 million prize. It remains the highest jackpot to go unclaimed in New York Lottery history. https://www.rebelmouse.com/lottocashmachine/ The next year, a ticket in Brooklyn went unclaimed again, this time for a jackpot of $46 million. Winnings can go unclaimed for a variety of reasons, Calicchia said, noting sometimes tickets or lost or become unreadable after being left in a pocket and washed. She said many tickets are unclaimed because winners don't notice they scored with smaller, tiered prizes in lottery jackpots. "Most people don't realize that there is more than one prize in the lottery drawing," she said. Rye is in Westchester County and is about 30 miles north of New York City. The New York Gaming Commission regulates all aspects of gaming and gambling activity in New York state, including horse racing, charitable gaming and the state lottery. CNN's Deanna Hackney contributed to this report.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://chilp.it/9db024

UFC helped give FS1 a ratings last Saturday with their Boston show featuring Chael Sonnen vs. Mauricio Shogun. It drew a 1.5 cable rating with 1.8 million viewers watching the show. Given the hectic problems Fox had with cable providers in getting the channel on outlets that weren't third-level tier packages, the rating UFC drew was incredible. It was a real show of strength. The strength it showed for Zuffa is a kind of hardcore fan strength that a cable property loves to see. And not only that, this cable property is highly geared towards the 18-to-34 year old demographic that is reportedly 80% male. What makes UFC such a fascinating company right now on television is that they cater towards a demographic that network suits drool over. They also are a "cable strong" property, not a "network strong" property. In the United States landscape where cable is still king even with the looming threat of "zero TV," being cable strong can be a very valuable thing. 1.8 million viewers for a Fox Sports 1 show is pretty damn good. What's so interesting is that in any other country, being a "cable strong" property instead of being a "network strong" television property would mean doom for your financial model. In Japan, network television is still king. Drawing 1.8 million viewers wouldn't even get you a sniff at a 4 AM time slot unless you wanted to pay for television time and bring your own sponsors along. And even then, you might get rejected. When PRIDE ran their Bushido series of lighter-weight fighters, they drew 5-to-6 million viewers for edited broadcasts that aired on lousy Fuji TV time slots late in the night a day or a week later after an event took place. 6 million viewers was seen as largely a failure to network television executives. Bushido meant "hardcore" and the suits didn't care about hardcore otakus watching an MMA fight product. They wanted a product that would attract 15-to-20 million casual television viewers on broadcast television. Many of PRIDE's biggest shows drew insanely high ratings on broadcast television. If PRIDE had been a "cable strong" product, they wouldn't have lasted for more than a few shows -- even with yakuza money backing the operation. However, "cable strong" has its usefulness in the United States marketplace and the UFC is about to take great advantage of this. If UFC can't grow the tent and appeal to casual fans, then at least maximize the value amongst the hardcores and see where it goes. Ratings for FS1 shows after the UFC Boston event did very well.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://goo.gl/fb/G936j

"We're hopeful the lucky winner has already signed the ticket and is making plans to claim it before it's too late," said Gardner Gurney, acting director of the Division of the Lottery. The New York Gaming Commission uses all means possible to get the word out when it is presented with an unclaimed prize, including news media and social media, said Christy Calicchia, spokesperson for the commission. To claim the money, the winner must present the ticket at any one of New York's seven customer service centers during business hours. Since the one-year anniversary of the ticket's purchase falls on a Sunday, the winner would technically need to have presented the ticket by the close of business Friday, said Calicchia. It is unclear how the situation would be handled if the ticket were to be turned in on Monday, she said. Lottery winners may also turn in winning tickets by mail. As long as the ticket is postmarked by August 25, it will be deemed valid. The gaming commission will be monitoring incoming mail to see if the ticket turns up, Calicchia said. New York state has seen several prizes go unclaimed, the largest of which was drawn more than a decade ago. In 2002, the owner of a winning ticket sold in Brooklyn never came forward to collect the $68 million prize. It remains the highest jackpot to go unclaimed in New York Lottery history. The next year, a ticket in Brooklyn went unclaimed again, this time for a jackpot of $46 million. Winnings can go unclaimed for a variety of reasons, Calicchia said, noting sometimes tickets or lost or become unreadable after being left in a pocket and washed.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://bit.ly/14MM3p2

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl